Winter Vacation Essentials

Tropical winter vacation? Here are the essentials.

While you’ve always cherished the challenges that cold weather brings to you in the heart of winter, a tropical change in plans is a welcome sight. You can bring back those summertime pastels, breath-of-fresh-air cotton tees, and reintroduce your skin to the sun.

Tropical locations are the best way to let winter melt away. You get to visit summer and idle the hours away till you implement a new and much more peaceful reality.

Sometimes winter is that time of year that we wish we could just fast-forward through. That’s what vacation is for. Put your winter coat away, relax, and ignore the clock.

First off, are you going with family, friends, or is it a solo tropical winter vacation?

Depending on what kind of vacation you’ll be having you can more appropriately pack for the occasion. Are you hiking to the top of a mountain with your five-year-old? Maybe, but it’s more likely you’ll find a spot at the beach to build sandcastles or go swimming.

You might also prefer to go to a family friendly restaurant with a kids’ menu than to experiment with an avant-garde restaurant that ignores your urgency for substitutions. “No, Timmy doesn’t like seaweed garnish. Do you have hotdogs and ketchup?” No need to bring formal wear if that’s the case.

Swimsuits for the family.

You might have stored your swimwear for the winter unless you frequent an indoor pool every so often. Either way you’re going to be needing swimsuits when you head to the beach. Keep in mind, the water may not be as warm as the air, so a quick plunge might be the wiser choice. But if you’re near water the temperature may not matter. “Guys, it’s not frozen! Let’s gooooo!”

Pack those UPF shirts too! If you only brought a TSA approved sunblock bottle, bringing your UPF shirts will definitely save you from having to find your favorite sunblock in town.

Rain or shine are the two options.

You’re likely to encounter some rain when you head to the tropics. While it’s cold and dry in your neck of the woods, a rain jacket is far better than a down jacket.

  • Bring along a hat and sunglasses or else you’ll have to buy them there.
  • Choose a hat that will work best in the sunlight and potentially in rain. A baseball hat will do the trick so long as it’s not cotton and instead that it’s made from more synthetic, waterproof materials.

Don’t forget the tote.

When you don’t quite know what you’ll be carrying on a daily basis, it’s important to keep that canvas tote close by. If you have younger kids, then you’ll love that you can keep almost everything you need in there. With older kids you’ll still find it a handy receptacle as they start finding things on the beach or souvenirs for their friends. A tote per child is recommended.

Bring your best wicking clothes.

Clothes that you can move around in without worrying about the humidity or the heat will keep you feeling fresh all day. Wicking tees will be that saving grace. Especially when you’re not used to the heat or the humidity after leaving your local arctic tundra.

It’s also easy to pack this stuff since it’s more lightweight. That’s good news too when you’re trying to fit as many souvenirs in your suitcase as possible.

What should you bring for the nighttime?

We often forget about the nighttime in the tropics since we’re so enamored by the idea that there’s a blue sky and a hot sun in December. Best tip? Treat it the way you do in the summer back home.

You can bring a pair of pajamas for the nighttime. Pajama shorts are great too. The whole family can have a tropical pajama party if that’s what it comes to.

Overall pack light.

You’re running away from the heavy winter gear right about now so you should absolutely be packing as little as you can. If only there was a coat check at the airport then you wouldn’t need to wear five layers of Hawaiian shirts on your way in.

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