Family Holiday

5 tips for the best family holiday

How to have a successful holiday for children, parents, aunts, uncles, and grandparents.

Holiday season! Time for cozy cardigan sweaters, impossible airports, Christmas matching pajamas, hot cocoa and catching up with family, getting the perfect gifts, dropping car keys in the snow, trying to get the dog's booties on, and so much more! 'Tis the season to be frantic but also lots of jolly. Here are five tips to keep the well-knit family bond growing.

1. Outside activities — snowball fights?

Let's avoid dividing the family and try something new: Snowball Togethers. That's right. Gear up the family in their warmest winter jackets and make a variety of snowballs together. Maybe stack them on top of each other. Try one more? Oh, it's…a snowfriend! Bonus task: try fitting the snowman with one of your favorite flannel shirts. Woah there, Snow Dad!

2. Spend quality time — be the family psychic.

Hone in on facial cues when talking to Aunt Nancy about your favorite styles this year. Try asking obscure questions about cloth, fabric, things that would maybe release a hint that she got you that amazing cashmere sweater you've been posting about on your very public holiday wish list. Note: leave the crystal ball at home to avoid suspicion.

3. Be in the moment — put the phones away.

Have everybody turn off their phones and put them in a basket after they toss their winter coats on the rack. That way you can have genuine awkward moments together. If there's somebody who can't remember the name of that movie with the guy with coiffed hair and the funny turtleneck with the whole rigmarole of ahhh, it's on the tip of my…iceberg? Is that the phrase?

4. Cooking together — new family recipe.

This one takes a little preparation so before everybody meets up for the holidays figure out which one food everybody loves and find a recipe that you can name after the whole gang. Is everybody on board with peanut butter? Make some PB&J inspired Famwiches. This applies to other reunions while you're back at home too. Old college buds? Call your ramen recipe something like Boring Professor or General Ed. Get tacky, get creative!

5. Create new memories — talk about something else.

Tend to have a heated discussion with Uncle Joe? Well with those phones put away you can talk about the best firewood. What's your opinion on pine? Is walnut a better burn? How about yew? What do you think? In case your knowledge of firewood is limited to the trees you can see in the backyard, there's always room to talk about warm winter coats too and on the scale from one to heated, this might be a perfect way to talk about something else.

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