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Football fashion: how to dress for your favorite sports.

Once you're sitting under those shining stadium lights (or high school bleacher seats) to take in all the action on the gridiron, whatever you've decided to wear to the football game should be the last thing on your mind. But that won't be the case if you haven't dressed properly.

To keep discomfort, a creeping chill or inclement weather from spoiling your concentration during the big game, consider our suggestions of what to wear during your favorite sport.

We'll start with the most obvious choice: jeans.

Let's face it, football games aren't the time and place to wear a pair of chinos. Seats have a tendency to be—how do we say this—less than pristine, which raises the possibility that lighter-colored pants may not look so light once the game has finished. And that isn't even accounting for the errant drip of nacho cheese or the very real danger of hot dog spills. So don't risk it, don't overthink it, and stick to dark denim that won't show dirt so visibly and can be easily washed.

Now, what's a better companion to a pair of jeans than a flannel shirt?

We consider the humble flannel-shirt to be the go-to upper layer for any football occasion. And don't think that you'd have to forgo the team jersey to wear one. As a matter of fact, they're both compatible. On a brisk day, you can wear the flannel shirt as a first layer and then layer a football jersey on top. Best of all, the flannel shirt will keep your arms that would have otherwise been exposed by the jersey's short sleeves warm.

But there will come a time in the season when a flannel shirt worn below a jersey just won't be enough. When this time comes, upgrade your gear by throwing a fleece jacket over your flannel shirt or jersey. If another layer of warmth is needed you can add a cotton sweater between fleece jacket and jersey.

If there is even a chance of showers in the forecast, you're going to want to be prepared.

However, all of this planning won't make for the ideal game experience if a few rain clouds decide to turn the game into a wet affair. Do that by opting for a rain jacket. And if the weather conditions remain dry at the beginning, you don't have to walk in wearing the rain jacket. Look for a packable version that you can easily carry with you and keep on hand in case those rain showers begin.

But we haven't even dealt with the topic that looms—literally—over those late-season match-ups: snow storms.

As the existence of legendary "snow bowl" games can attest, football is one sport that doesn't cancel its games easily, and isn't afraid of a little snow falling on the field.

You shouldn't be either, and won't have to be so long as you are properly prepared. At this point, a team jersey unfortunately doesn't make a lot of sense, but you can always express team loyalty through cold weather accessories like hats, scarves and gloves. Instead, concentrate on layering to maximum effect by starting with a turtleneck base layer, and then add a flannel shirt, fleece jacket, or both, and top with a rain jacket or a parka depending on the weather. But above all else, make sure that you have a pair of winter boots for the game. Even the most diehard of sports fans can find themselves taking in the last quarter via radio from the warmth of their heated car if their feet aren't properly insulated.

Fortunately, you won't make the same mistake.

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